Sunday, March 29, 2009

British Link to Separatist, Leftist, Islamist Militancy

Date: Thu, 26 Mar 2009 12:24:31 +0600
From: K A Huq
Subject: British Link to Militancy : Copy of letter to US Secretary of State

DHAKA, Thursday, 26 March 2009.

Dear all,

Assalamu alaykum.

Please find attached herewith my e-mail letter faxed to US Secretary of State describing our suspicion that British Ministry of Defence and DFID are likely to be at the bottom of most of the Separatist, Leftist, Islamist militancy in the Indian Sub-continent which unfortunately is a former British colony and still is the major Breeding Ground of British Mercenaries.

We can not forget that in the Purulia Arms Drop case it was revealed that the consignment was organized and sent by British Military Intelligence. But to instigate Indian authorities against Bangladesh the cases of arms and ammunitions were intirguingly marked  ‘Technical Equipment’ and  ‘Central Ordnance Depot, Rajendrapur Cantonment, Bangladesh’.


It is also important to note that British intelligence is the mother of 6 member countries of the so-called Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). Brtish intelligence continues to fix policies of these countries and Britain uses these countries for implementation of her conspiracies to defame Islam, Islamic institutions, Islamic Polity and pious Muslim population.  

Best regards,

Kazi Azizul Huq 

International Affairs Secretary,

Bangladesh Khelafat Andolon

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Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2009 23:40:20 +0600
To: "H.E. Secretary of State H. Clinton"
From: K A Huq
Subject: British MOD is at the bottom most of the militancy in the sub-continent
Cc: usdeptstate@mailnj.custhelp.com

Dt: March 25,2009.

To: H.E. Secretary of State H. Clinton, Department of State, USA.

Cc: To Whom It May Concern

Dear Excellency,

Since the probe into Purulia arms drop case in West Bengal it has been proved beyond doubt how dirty the British can be.  

Before British Colonial rule people of the Indian Sub-continent never experienced Hindu-Muslim riots. Most of the Muslim rulers had their military headed by Hindu Generals. But the British never in their entire colonial rule trusted any Indian to head their military.

We are always suspicious that the British Administration (MoD, DFID, etc.) is at the bottom of most of the ethnic separatist, leftist, Islamist militancy in the sub-continent. They are also trying to instigate separatist insurgency inside China and divert the blame on outside Muslims to turn the Chinese Government inimical toward the Muslims. The British have recently installed a Maoist government in Nepal. The British are trying to organize the militant leftists of South Asia presumably to destabilize the region and eliminate the believers. Because the British government is the prime mover of atheism and social perversion (fornication, live together, homosexual activism etc.).

We strongly suspect the British to be at the bottom of 25-26 February 2009 terrorism inside BDR Headquarters in Dhaka. Analysts say that the British managed FBI as well as CBI. They allured multiple people including Sheikh Rehana, Sajib Wazed Joy and Lt.Col. (Retd.) Faruk Khan with dream of becoming future CEO of Bangladesh.

Now it has been dugout in Bangladesh that British NGO is creating their own Madrasa in Bangladesh with militancy agenda to destabilize this nation and create pretext for media campaign and attack on genuine Islamic religious educational institutions in Bangladesh.  

We hope, the US in her own interest and for protecting here own image will distance herself from British dirty games.

Best regards,

Kazi Azizul Huq
E-mail: kahuq@dhaka.net

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Purulia arms drop: December 17, 1995.

Excerpts

• Peter Bleach, whose full name is Peter von Kalkstein-Bleach, was 46 years old at the time. He is a former corporal in British military intelligence and had served in the armed forces for over 20 years in, among other places, Southern Africa and Belfast.

• The delivery was not for the Indian government, but for an insurgent group

• The third man showed Bleach the area on a map where he wanted the illegal arms to be delivered. It was just inside West Bengal.

• The Letter of Credit was issued by a Hong Kong bank and signed by ‘Kim P. Davey’– this turned out to be the third man. (British Top Spy Chris Patten was the Governor of Hong Kong at that time)

• Bleach says he contacted the Ministry of Defence through someone he knew in the Defence Export Services Organisation (DESO) and was put in touch with an official on the India desk, Colin Allkins, whom he fully informed of the secret plan. .....

• ‘Davey’ wanted to know if the arms could be delivered by ship and then taken by road to Purulia in West Bengal. But Bleach said he convinced him that this method was too difficult, and that it was much better to use an aircraft. If the aircraft were bought, it could be resold or used for other things, and it was this idea that attracted ‘Davey’. He wanted to base the aircraft in Dhaka.

• Peter Bleach took $30,000 from ‘Davey’ to hire the services of the crew on the assumption that the plane would in future be based in Dhaka. 

• ‘Davey’ arranged for Bleach to find a cargo plane to ferry the arms. This turned out to be an ageing Russian-built Antonov 26.

• Antonov 26 freighter was registered as AH 266 and was transferred to Carol Air Services Ltd, a company based in Hong Kong but registered in October 1995 in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Carol Air was reported to be a subsidiary of a Hong Kong company that had employed ‘Davey’.  

• The Russian-built plane was based for the time being in Riga, Latvia, home of the five-person crew.

• On 21 November, the Antonov left Riga for India and Pakistan, but apparently did not visit Bangladesh.

• By November 1995, Bleach was in touch with a UK weapons trading company, Border Technology and Innovations Ltd (BTI) of Hexham, England, to order the consignment on behalf of ‘Davey’. BTI claimed that it had agents in 22 countries in 1990 and has secured military and civil defence contracts in 15 countries including Angola, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Thailand. The company said that Bleach showed them what appeared to be a valid end-user certificate from the Bangladesh Ministry of Defence

• On 10 December 1995, the Antonov landed in Burgas, Bulgaria, to collect the 77 wooden cases of arms. Bleach says that when he departed for Burgas from Gatwick a plain-clothed UK customs officer met him and said he knew of the deal.  

• Both ‘Davey’ and Bleach boarded the plane before it took off with the arms cargo and headed for Karachi. 

• Flying from Karachi on 17 December 1995, the old Antonov lumbered towards West Bengal, landing at Varanasi to refuel.

• It then took off again headed for Rangoon. Close to midnight en route over Gaya in West Bengal, the crew claim that ‘Davey’ suddenly ordered them at gunpoint to fly low over the villages of Purulia in order to drop the arms. 

• Defiantly, they did not fly very low, but the arms cases were nevertheless dropped and landed miles off target, using parachute rigging that had been bought in South Africa.  

• Cases were marked ‘Technical Equipment’ and bore the name ‘Central Ordnance Depot, Rajendrapur Cantonment, Bangladesh’. 

• After the drop, the aircraft went back on track towards Rangoon, but was refused permission to land due to ‘poor visibility’. It then headed back to Calcutta, refuelled and took off towards Phuket, Thailand, where the plane landed in the early hours of 18 December.

• Seeing the parachutes falling from the sky, and finding with amazement the broken crates of arms and ammunition, the villagers of Purulia ran to tell the authorities.

• On 21 December, the freighter re-entered Indian airspace supposedly en route to Calcutta, but because of ‘bad weather’ it changed course and landed at Madras, apparently to refuel for an onward journey back to Pakistan. Again, no action was taken by the Indian security services. It took off again at 10:45 p.m. the same night and headed for Karachi. 

• Within two hours’ flying time from Pakistan, the old Antonov was ordered to land by Indian air traffic controllers because it was on an unscheduled route. It landed at Sahar airport in Bombay at 1:39 am on 22 December and was ordered to park at a remote side of the airport for refuelling. It was an hour before Indian officials turned up. ‘Davey’ simply walked off the Antonov and quickly disappeared, while Bleach and the five Latvians were arrested and jailed. 

• According to Bleach, ‘Davey’ took advantage of the lax security at the airport. A Sahar airport official who had investigated the aircraft on landing said he had no knowledge of the arms drop at Purulia until Bleach told him. Up until then, all he knew was that the plane had flown off course from Thailand. According to the Indian police, a computer laptop found on the plane apparently belonging to ‘Davey’ showed 49 places over which the plane intended to fly.  

• In the days after the arms drop at Purulia on 17 December, India’s news media were awash with speculation as to what had happened. 

• Suspicion was directed mainly at Pakistan’s secret service once it was known that the aircraft had flown in from Karachi, while the West Bengali authorities denied having received a warning. 

• Ananda Marga and the Bangladesh Government dismissed any involvement in ordering the arms, and some journalists speculated on possible links to arms for the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka, but without proof.

• Meanwhile, the Bulgarian government issued a statement rejecting any responsibility for the supply of the arms. Even so, within two weeks the Indian Government decided to switch its purchase of 100,000 assault rifles from Bulgaria to Romania. 

• The Indian security and aviation authorities were accused of being inept, and an inter-agency panel set up by the government recommended strict monitoring of all unscheduled cargo flights, but stopped short of requiring all freight service agents to register their clients. 

• Peter Bleach and the five Latvians were transferred to a jail in Calcutta and charged on 24 December 1995 with ‘abetting the waging of war against India and criminal conspiracy’, a charge comparable to treason. 

• The younger brother of ‘Randy’, Vinay Kumar Singh, was accused of waiting with his brother to transport the weapons and was also arrested and charged. 

• Indian police arrested eleven Ananda Marga monks, including three US nationals and a Greek and Irishman, but they were released after no incriminating evidence was found. 


Purulia arms drop: December 17, 1995.

 
Peter Bleach, convicted in the Purulia arms drop case.

Bleach was sentenced for a life term and was in a Kolkata prison for dropping crates of missiles, rifles and rocket launchers in Purulia district of West Bengal on the night of December 17, 1995.

The British secured his release. 

The demand of British Government to release him was met after Deputy Prime Minister Lal Kishenchand Advani had a 30-minute meeting with his British counterpart David Blunkett in Delhi.

British Prime Minister Tony Blair had discussed Bleach's case with Advani in London in June 2003. India had then offered to review the matter. 

India pardoned and released the five Latvian crew members of the Russian plane used to drop the arms and ammunition.


Peter Bleach, whose full name is Peter von Kalkstein-Bleach, was 46 years old at the time. He is a former corporal in British military intelligence and had served in the armed forces for over 20 years in, among other places, Southern Africa and Belfast. He claimed that his own UK-based company, Aeroserve, had a licence to handle weapons from the UK Ministry of Defence.

The delivery was not for the Indian government, but for an insurgent group. He was introduced to the third man, but he was not given the man’s name.

The third man showed Bleach the area on a map where he wanted the illegal arms to be delivered. It was just inside West Bengal. .. Bleach advised that arms could be delivered to such an area only by parachute drop or by covert landing. He insisted that only the pilot who was to deliver the arms should know the ultimate destination. ‘I stressed from the very beginning’, Bleach recalls, ‘that, in order to be successful, it is most important that this resembles a perfectly, normal transaction in every possible way… No single contractor should be aware of the entire route.’ ...

Bleach says he contacted the Ministry of Defence through someone he knew in the Defence Export Services Organisation (DESO) and was put in touch with an official on the India desk, Colin Allkins, whom he fully informed of the secret plan. .....

The letter was issued by a Hong Kong bank and signed by ‘Kim P. Davey’– this turned out to be the third man. 

Friends of ‘Davey’ apparently called him ‘Peter’, but Interpol now believes that his real name is Niels Christian Nielsen, born in Denmark in December 1961. He took the name Kim Palgrave Davey from a New Zealand infant who died at the age of five weeks and managed to acquire a New Zealand passport in that name after visiting New Zealand. 

Bleach says he continued to inform officials at DESO by fax and to ask for help.10 On 14 and 22 September, and 8 December 1995, he met police Special Branch officers in North Yorkshire and told them about ‘Davey’ and his three Danish associates. Bleach claims that the Special Branch officers responded by asking him to continue the deal. 

On 24 September, Bleach and his Danish contact flew to Dubai and then on to Dhaka, Bangladesh, where Bleach said he had to attend to his ‘normal’ business. On 27 September, they flew to Bangkok to finalize the new contract. Bleach said his contact told him on the journey that ‘Davey’ was in charge of the operation. 

Attending the Bangkok hotel dinner meeting were ‘Davey’, his lawyer, his business partner, Bleach, his Danish contact, and an Indian called ‘Randy’. ‘Davey’ wanted to know if the arms could be delivered by ship and then taken by road to Purulia in West Bengal. But Bleach said he convinced him that this method was too difficult, and that it was much better to use an aircraft. If the aircraft were bought, it could be resold or used for other things, and it was this idea that attracted ‘Davey’. He wanted to base the aircraft in Dhaka.

‘Davey’ arranged for Bleach to find a cargo plane to ferry the arms. This turned out to be an ageing Russian-built Antonov 26. A preliminary report of the Indian Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) claims that ‘Davey’ provided $250,000 to buy the freighter aircraft from the bankrupt Latvian Airlines – previously part of the USSR state-owned Aeroflot – and to hire the five-person air crew and two ground engineers for three months. 

Another report says Peter Bleach took $30,000 from ‘Davey’ to hire the services of the crew on the assumption that the plane would in future be based in Dhaka. 


The Antonov 26 freighter was registered as AH 266 and was transferred to Carol Air Services Ltd, a company based in Hong Kong but registered in October 1995 in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Carol Air was reported to be a subsidiary of a Hong Kong company that had employed ‘Davey’.  

The Russian-built plane was based for the time being in Riga, Latvia, home of the five-person crew. These were:-

1. Captain Alexander Klichine, the 44-year-old pilot, 
2. Igor Moskvitine (navigator), 
3. Oleg Gaidach (co-pilot), 
4. Yevgeni Antimenko (cargo operator) and 
5. Igor Timmerman (flight engineer). 

They were each offered a salary of about $1,000 for three months, provided they would move in due course to Bangladesh. It is worth bearing in mind that the salary of a Latvian pilot is probably about one-thirtieth that of a pilot in Western Europe. 

On 21 November, the Antonov left Riga for India and Pakistan, but apparently did not visit Bangladesh.

By November 1995, Bleach was in touch with a UK weapons trading company, Border Technology and Innovations Ltd (BTI) of Hexham, England, to order the consignment on behalf of ‘Davey’. BTI claimed that it had agents in 22 countries in 1990 and has secured military and civil defence contracts in 15 countries including Angola, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Thailand. The company said that Bleach showed them what appeared to be a valid end-user certificate from the Bangladesh Ministry of Defence, but an invoice given to Bleach for the order mentions a request for parachutes: ‘Peter…Total price is $170,000…We need EUC quickly to effect licences. Payment: $85,000 in advance, balance by bankers draft. Commission: $10,000 is in this for you. Parachutes not available.’ 

In any case, BTI did not need to apply for a UK arms export licence from the Department of Trade and Industry because, as with so many other UK-arranged arms deals, the firm would purchase the arms abroad and not bring them into UK jurisdiction. BTI turned to a well-known Bulgarian arms manufacturer, KAS Engineering, whose subsidiary, the Arsenal Company, was in a position to sell pistols and Kalashnikov rifles at low prices. Bleach later claimed that he distanced himself from the deal, put ‘Davey’ in touch with BTI and concentrated on finding the aircraft.  

Collection and Delivery

On 10 December 1995, the Antonov landed in Burgas, Bulgaria, to collect the 77 wooden cases of arms. Bleach says that when he departed for Burgas from Gatwick a plain-clothed UK customs officer met him and said he knew of the deal.  
Both ‘Davey’ and Bleach boarded the plane before it took off with the arms cargo and headed for Karachi. 

Flying from Karachi on 17 December 1995, the old Antonov lumbered towards West Bengal, landing at Varanasi to refuel. To Bleach’s surprise, the Indian customs and police authorities there took no steps to search the plane or arrest ‘Davey’ and the others. 

It then took off again headed for Rangoon. Close to midnight en route over Gaya in West Bengal, the crew claim that ‘Davey’ suddenly ordered them at gunpoint to fly low over the villages of Purulia in order to drop the arms. 

Defiantly, they did not fly very low, but the arms cases were nevertheless dropped and landed miles off target, using parachute rigging that had been bought in South Africa.  

Cases were marked ‘Technical Equipment’ and bore the name ‘Central Ordnance Depot, Rajendrapur Cantonment, Bangladesh’. 

After the drop, the aircraft went back on track towards Rangoon, but was refused permission to land due to ‘poor visibility’. It then headed back to Calcutta, refuelled and took off towards Phuket, Thailand, where the plane landed in the early hours of 18 December.

Seeing the parachutes falling from the sky, and finding with amazement the broken crates of arms and ammunition, the villagers of Purulia ran to tell the authorities. 

Afterwards, it was revealed that on 10 and 17 November and 15 December 1995, the UK Home Office had reported the plan to their counterparts in India, the Research and Analysis Wing (RAW), and the CBI had taken over the case on 27 December, but the latter had obviously failed to intercept the freighter. A security memorandum of 25 November from RAW to the Indian Government stated that a European-based businessman had wanted to deliver arms to Communist rebels in West Bengal. It said he had bought an Antonov 26, visited Riga for that purpose on 15 November and would try to land it at the airstrip of a disused coal mine in Dhanbad, near Purulia, called Panchet Hill. It would appear that by 17 December ‘Davey’ had discarded the idea of landing, in favour of the parachute drop, but that for some reason the Indian authorities were not prepared to stop the flight.

On 21 December, the freighter re-entered Indian airspace supposedly en route to Calcutta, but because of ‘bad weather’ it changed course and landed at Madras, apparently to refuel for an onward journey back to Pakistan. Again, no action was taken by the Indian security services. It took off again at 10:45 p.m. the same night and headed for Karachi. 

Within two hours’ flying time from Pakistan, the old Antonov was ordered to land by Indian air traffic controllers because it was on an unscheduled route. It landed at Sahar airport in Bombay at 1:39 am on 22 December and was ordered to park at a remote side of the airport for refuelling. It was an hour before Indian officials turned up. ‘Davey’ simply walked off the Antonov and quickly disappeared, while Bleach and the five Latvians were arrested and jailed. 

According to Bleach, ‘Davey’ took advantage of the lax security at the airport. A Sahar airport official who had investigated the aircraft on landing said he had no knowledge of the arms drop at Purulia until Bleach told him. Up until then, all he knew was that the plane had flown off course from Thailand. According to the Indian police, a computer laptop found on the plane apparently belonging to ‘Davey’ showed 49 places over which the plane intended to fly.  

In the days after the arms drop at Purulia on 17 December, India’s news media were awash with speculation as to what had happened. 

Suspicion was directed mainly at Pakistan’s secret service once it was known that the aircraft had flown in from Karachi, while the West Bengali authorities denied having received a warning. 

Ananda Marga and the Bangladesh Government dismissed any involvement in ordering the arms, and some journalists speculated on possible links to arms for the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka, but without proof.

Meanwhile, the Bulgarian government issued a statement rejecting any responsibility for the supply of the arms. Even so, within two weeks the Indian Government decided to switch its purchase of 100,000 assault rifles from Bulgaria to Romania. 

The Indian security and aviation authorities were accused of being inept, and an inter-agency panel set up by the government recommended strict monitoring of all unscheduled cargo flights, but stopped short of requiring all freight service agents to register their clients. 

Peter Bleach and the five Latvians were transferred to a jail in Calcutta and charged on 24 December 1995 with ‘abetting the waging of war against India and criminal conspiracy’, a charge comparable to treason. 

The younger brother of ‘Randy’, Vinay Kumar Singh, was accused of waiting with his brother to transport the weapons and was also arrested and charged. 

Indian police arrested eleven Ananda Marga monks, including three US nationals and a Greek and Irishman, but they were released after no incriminating evidence was found. 

 The CBI continued hunting for several Indian nationals in addition to ‘Davey’, who was accused of running a network of corrupt officials in India. 

If Bleach and the crew faced charges for which the minimum sentence is life imprisonment, while the maximum is death by hanging. They also faced charges under the Arms Act and Explosives Substances Act and the aviation laws. 

Mystery Remains

Incarcerated, Peter Bleach continued to argue his innocence by saying that he was involved as an informer with the full knowledge of the British security services. 

He produced faxes he had sent to UK government officials that he claimed would prove this. He alleged that the Indian security chiefs were warned long before the arms drop was made, but that they deliberately allowed the Antonov to shed its cargo in order to make political capital out of the result in West Bengal. 

One fax from Bleach to the UK MoD read: ‘I was informed that my quote was acceptable and I was invited to discuss the final details with the buyers, who were acting on behalf of the end-user. This turns out to be an illicit deal and the end-user appears at this stage to be an insurgent group in India.’ 

Bleach also claimed that UK Special Branch officers had initially encouraged him to provide a delivery plane. 

Bleach and his supporters accuse the British government of a cover-up over his failed deal and have demanded a statement admitting its role. 

One of those collecting evidence for Bleach’s defence is his friend, Jo Fletcher. She says her efforts to help him were thwarted by Special Branch officers: ‘… the Police came round – twenty members of Her Majesty’s Constabulary – at six thirty in the morning, banged on my door. They took all the documentation that I had brought down from Yorkshire, they took piles of my own paperwork and they also took my computer, which they broke – and Peter’s computer...’. North Yorkshire Police confirmed to the BBC that they did ‘collect evidence’ from Jo Fletcher’s home. Ministry of Defence and Foreign Office officials could offer no contradiction to Bleach’s story. 

Mystery remains as to the whereabouts and the exact role of Niels Christian Nielsen (alias ‘Kim Davey’), who has not been seen since his disappearance from Sahar airport on 22 December 1995. The Indian CBI told reporters that Nielsen had stayed in a hotel where he had made several phone calls to Bangladesh. They also believe that a Hong Kong-based businessman had financed the entire operation and that he was present in Riga with ‘Davey’ and Bleach when the deal to purchase the Antonov was struck.

The CBI allege there were 14 others, including three Danes and a Bangladeshi military officer, who were involved.

On 17 January 1997, Indian police arrested a man on arrival from Singapore at Bombay’s Sahar airport in connection with the Purulia case. The man awaiting questioning was believed by the police to be Joel Proren and was alleged by them to have helped Nielsen with the funds to purchase the Antonov in Latvia. The police said Proren was German-born, but then a US citizen who was resident in Kansas. An official from the US consulate visited Proren. When travelling from Singapore, he had used the name of ‘Schneider Martin Conrad’, but had been using six names – Ken Sando, Roy Dogen, Martin Olsen and Joel Proren. Asked what his real name was, he replied: ‘Call me Hanu man.’

__________________

1 This account is drawn largely from quoted documents, and the words of Peter Bleach, particularly his account of the affair published as ‘The Copenhagen Connection’, Sunday (reprinted from Politiken, Denmark), 11–17 May 1997, but also from the following accounts: Pranay Sharma, ‘RAW had Warned About the Covert An-26 Mission’, The Telegraph, 25 December 1995; Harinder Baweja; ‘Straining Credibility’, India Today, 11 March 1996; Chandan Nandy, ‘Indian Mole May Have Fled to Colombo’, The Telegraph, 30 December 1996; Special Correspondent, ‘Vital Clues Unearthed in Purulia Case’, The Hindu, 24 January 1997; Richard Norton-Taylor, ‘Gun Running Briton Faces Indian Death Sentence’, The Guardian, 21 August 1997; Stephen Grey, ‘Ex-soldier Abandoned after Tipping off Police’, The Sunday Times, 28 September 1997; Peter Popham, ‘I was Betrayed by MoD, Says Briton Facing Execution’, The Independent, 9 July 1998; Raymond Bonner, ‘Legal Loopholes Make Arms Shipments Easy’, The Globe and Mail, 15 July 1998; Saheli Mitra, ‘The Mystery of Arms and Men’, The Telegraph, 13 January 1999; Oxfam UK, Out of Control, 1999; Anish Gupta with Sourabh Sen, Soumen Dutta & Summit Das Gupta, ‘A Twist in the Trial’, Special Report, Sunday, 30 May–4 June 1999; and Tyne Tees Television, ‘The Bleach Conspiracy’, 25 August 1999. Where important details vary, an attempt has been made to indicate a particular source.

2 Peter Bleach, ‘The Copenhagen Connection’.
3 Ibid. The other Dane has since denied that arms were discussed, claiming that they discussed the transport of prawns and turtles from Bangladesh to Hong Kong.
4 Ibid.
5 Peter Bleach, quoted by Bonner, ‘Legal Loopholes...’.
6 Bleach faxed a detailed account of the planned operation to Colin Allkins at DESO on 18 August 1995, according to Gupta et al., ‘A Twist in the Trial’. DESO is part of the UK Ministry of Defence and employs about 700 staff to help UK arms manufacturers market and sell their products abroad.
7 Bleach, ‘The Copenhagen Connection’. Bleach subsequently told the UK police that the letter of credit was worth $460,000.
8 Bonner, ‘Legal Loopholes…’.
9 The Hindu, 24 January 1997; Sunday, 11 May 1997; Bonner, ‘Legal Loopholes...’. 
10 Bleach, ‘The Copenhagen Connection’. A copy of Bleach’s fax of 18 August 1995 to Colin All-kins at DESO was published in Sunday, 1–7 January 1997.
11 Gupta et al., who quote from court evidence. Richard Norton-Taylor, ‘Army Told of Indian Arms Deal’, The Guardian, 12 September 1997, also quotes from Bleach’s correspondence, saying Bleach gave the UK police the precise grid reference for the arms drop.
12 Bleach, ‘The Copenhagen Connection’.
13 Tyne Tees Television, ‘The Bleach Conspiracy’.
14 Bleach, ‘The Copenhagen Connection’.; Peter Popham, ‘I was Betrayed…’. 
15 Stephen Grey, ‘Ex-soldier Abandoned…’.
16 According to Caroline Lees & Simon Hinde, ‘Sky Full of Rifles Alerts Indians to Brewing Revolt’, The Sunday Times, 1 January 1996, Bleach had reportedly tendered to supply Russian-made helicopters to the Bangladeshi Ministry of Defence but had not won the contract. 
17 Bleach, ‘The Copenhagen Connection’. 
18 Ibid.
19 The Hindu, 24 January 1997.
20 Bonner, ‘Legal Loopholes...’.
21 lbid. In addition, Oxfam, Out of Control, claims that shares of Carol Air were transferred to an investment company registered in the Isle of Man in November 1995.
22 Gupta et al., ‘A Twist in the Trial’. According to Oxfam and Grey, op. cit., BTI also had an address in Abingdon, Oxfordshire.
23 Oxfam, Out of Control. According to Grey, the Bangladeshi end-user certificate appears to have been a forgery. According to Bonner, Bleach claimed that BTI were paid $165,000 for the first shipment.
24 Bonner, ‘Legal Loopholes...’. 
25 Gupta et al., ‘A Twist…’.
26 Oxfam quotes from a fax ‘between’ BTI and Bleach on 10 November 1995 that defines the consignment from KAS engineering as 300 AK-47 Kalashnikov assault rifles, 15 Makarov pistols, two sniper rifles with night vision sights, 2 night vision binoculars, 25,000 rounds of rifle ammunition, 6,000 rounds of pistol ammunition, 10 RPG-7 rocket launchers, 100 anti-tank grenades, 100 ordinary grenades, and 25 PM79 anti-personnel mines. Another fax quoted by Oxfam from BTI to KAS Engineering [no date given] states that: ‘Commercial invoice should describe goods as "goods as per contract No. 046-HPS 10.11.95" to keep within the ideal of our Swiss Bank.’ Oxfam, Out of Control.
27 Tyne Tees Television, ‘The Bleach Conspiracy’.
28 Pranay Sharma reports the Indian aviation authorities’ allegation that the crew were allowed to make a trial ‘dry run’ flight to India in December 1995 before loading the arms for West Bengal, but this may be confused with the November flight from Riga. It appears that the crew and the Bulgarians were told the arms were for delivery to Bangladesh. Sharma, ‘RAW had Warned…’.
29 Popham, ‘I was Betrayed…’.
30 Norton-Taylor, ‘Gun Running Briton’. Lees & Hinde, ‘Sky Full of Rifles…’, report that Bleach said half the arms consignment was left in Karachi.
31 Gupta et al., ‘A Twist in the Trial’.
32 Tyne Tees Television, ‘The Bleach Conspiracy’.
33 Sharma, ‘RAW had Warned…’; Ashis A. Biswas, ‘Still in a Maze’, Outlook (India), 26 February 1997.
34 Gupta et al., ‘A Twist in the Trial’; Baweja, ‘Straining Credibility’.
35 Gupta et al. ‘A Twist in the Trial’.
36 Baweja, ‘Straining Credibility’. Michael Howard, the UK Home Secretary, confirmed in January 1996 that his officials had informed the Indian authorities of the plan.
37 Gupta et al., ‘A Twist in the Trial’.
38 Ibid.
39 Tim McGirk, ‘Would-be Hero Poisoned by his Own Sting’, The Independent, 11 September 1996.
40 For this account see Grey, ‘Ex-soldier Abandoned…’; Nandy, ‘Indian Mole…’; Bonner, ‘Legal Loopholes…’.
41 Mitra, ‘The Mystery of Arms and Men’.
42 Pranay Sharma, ‘Pakistan Suspected in Arms Drop’, The Telegraph, 22 December 1995.
43 Murali Krishnan & Sinjoy Chowdury, ‘LTTE Theory Gaining Ground’, The Telegraph, 
30 December 1995; AFP, ‘India to Buy Arms from Romania’, 16 January 1996.
44 Murali Krishnan, ‘Pvt Air Services to be Combed’, The Telegraph, 30 December 1996.
45 The Telegraph, 11 December 1996.
46 Lees & Hinde, ‘Sky Full of Rifles…’.
47 Mitra, ‘The Mystery of Arms and Men’; Special Correspondent, The Hindu, ‘Vital Clues…’; Bleach claims that ‘Davey’ had bribed all the necessary police in India to ensure that his gold smugglers were released within 24 hours (Bleach, ‘The Copenhagen Connection’). 
48 Special Correspondent, The Hindu , ‘Vital Clues…’; Tyne Tees Television, ‘The Bleach Conspiracy’.
49 BBC Radio 4, 11 September 1998.
50 Christopher Hudson, who visited Bleach in 1997, told BBC Radio 4 : ‘He was dealing here with hardened criminals who were anxious that he knew too much. These were not the men to go back on a deal with. Having entered it, he couldn't just back off – as the authorities claimed could happen. That isn't the way it’s done. Once you're inside the tent you stay inside because to venture out is to face death.’ Hudson also claimed that Bleach’s health was deteriorating in prison, with gangrene in his toes. ‘It’s a horrid, terrible prison. He has to defecate in a bucket. There’s a smell of raw sewage everywhere.’ The Latvian crew’s relatives complained that the prison conditions for their men were worse than Bleach’s, and that there were no legal representation or family or consular visits. Two of the men had serious medical conditions.
51 BBC Radio 4; Norton-Taylor, ‘Gun Running Briton’.
52 Ibid.
53 Staff Reporter, ‘Armsdrop Trial Begins Today’, The Telegraph, 1 August 1997.
54 Nandy & Murshed, ‘RAW Tip-off to Arrest Arms Drop Suspect’, The Telegraph, Calcutta, 22 January 1997; Special Correspondent, The Hindu, ‘Vital Clues…’; Mitra, ‘The Mystery of Arms and Men’.
55 Special Correspondent, The Hindu, ‘Vital Clues…’. Hanuman is the much-loved Hindu monkey-god who is invincible, the most intelligent being on earth and one of the very few Hindu gods who lives on earth in a physical incarnation at all times.


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